Tying digital media and actions to in-store behaviors

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Many brands struggle to prove ROI for their digital media spend. These 3 simple strategies can to tie real-world conversions to digital advertising.

Unlike TV and Radio advertising, digital media offers the possibility of tracking individual ad views to purchases. Many brands have made this leap for their online and in-app purchases, but a much smaller number have taken the next step and started tying digital media to real-world activity – or even realized that it’s possible!

That’s a huge missed opportunity – for modern advertisers being able to accurately link media to sales is an essential step in proving the value of campaigns. There are three main strategies that can be used to do this deterministically. Continue reading

PII, Analytics, and Advertising

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I’ve been thinking about privacy and the inherent conflict between the drive by advertisers to want to know more and the need to respect end users personal information.  I ended up writing two articles about it.  The first is up on the RadiumOne corporate blog and talks about threats to end user Personally Identifiable Information (PII) presented by the growing trend toward integrating mobile analytics tools with programatic media buying solutions and how RadiumOne is addressing that issue.

The Fight to Keep Personally Identifiable Information Private on Mobile

The second post is up on iCrunchData news and goes a bit more into the nuts and bolts of digital media targeting, as well as some of the threats to user data posed by solutions that don’t use the data themselves but store it on behalf of third parties.

Why Modern Advertising is Based on a Contradiction

Enjoy!

Security Culture

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Most websites today run on non-secure connections (http instead of https) most of the time – and that’s just fine. Browsing pictures of cheeseburger-craving cats doesn’t require a secure connection because the user isn’t sharing any sensitive information. Even e-commerce sites usually only use secure connections for the actual transactions- no one cares what shoes you’re looking at but they might be interested in your credit card information so it’s the credit card transaction that e-commerce sites protect by forcing a secure connection.

This minimalist approach to security has been driven partly by user indifference but also partly because SSL certificates (which allow sites to encrypt user data and enable secure connections) have historically been fairly expensive – though that is now changing rapidly. After all, why spend the money on a certificate for your site if it’s not necessary and your users won’t derive any tangible benefit from it? So while a minority of internet users might have preferred to browse in secure mode all the time, it simply wasn’t an option on many websites.

All of this is interesting if you’re into tech trivia but not something most developers have spent a lot of time thinking about. For social media developers,however, that’s changing and changing fast. Facebook has recently announced that they’re going to require that all app developers in their ecosystem be able to serve both secure and non-secure versions of each tab. They’ve also introduced a ‘secure browsing mode’ which allows users to check a box once and have their entire Facebook experience automatically shifted from http to https.

Continue reading